Author Archives: Patrick Cole

About Patrick Cole

Husband, parent and writer. Sharing stories with hopefully a little humor and wisdom along the way.

High Coo – Nov 25 – Retail Therapy?

WIBW

Retail therapy is shopping with the primary purpose of improving the buyer’s mood or disposition. Often seen in people during periods of depression or stress, … (the term) was first used in the 1980s, with the first reference being this sentence in the Chicago Tribune of Christmas Eve 1986: “We’ve become a nation measuring out our lives in shopping bags and nursing our psychic ills through retail therapy ….

The fact that shopping may provide a short time of comfort (relief from dysphoria), but also imposes costs and is subject to comedown and withdrawal, make it, like opioid use, either a therapy or an addiction, depending on whether each person uses it adaptively or maladaptively. Retail therapy thus exists on a spectrum with shopping addiction (compulsive buying disorder).” https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Retail_therapy

Here’s an interesting book for your consideration:

“Often unknowingly the vast majority of us collude in a system that encourages addiction and co-dependence – and sees these states as normal. Many of us are addicted to chemicals, not only to alcohol or drugs but nicotine, caffeine, chocolate and overeating in general. Even more of us are involved in addictive processes: workaholism, gambling, compulsive shopping, sex, and so on. The realization of the extent of our addictions, both individually and as a society, is shocking but this book shows that these addictions can be identified and reversed.” https://annewilsonschaef.com/books/society-becomes-addict/

Today’s senryu: Retail Therapy?

grasping for success

I took comfort in shopping

for what, I’m not sure

BE CAREFUL OUT THERE

High Coo – Nov 24 – Thanksgiving Day Wisdom

I am thankful for life and for the wisdom to appreciate life. Here are a couple of thoughts that come to mind for me today:

“If the only prayer you ever say in your entire life is Thank You, it will be enough.” Meister Eckhart https://internetpoem.com/meister-eckhart/quotes/

Psalm 92: “It is good to give thanks. Does God need to hear my praise? No, I need to express it. To awaken to wonder, to holiness, to God, I must transcend the ego-centered drama I pretend is life. To shatter pretense, give thanks. Each thank-you reduces the false you. When I give thanks, I embrace others. When I give thanks, I move from drama to play and discover the aliveness that Is when I stop playing God and discover that God is playing me. It is good to give thanks for through thanksgiving awakening lies.” Minyan – Ten Principles for Living a Life of Integrity (c) 1997 Rabbi Rami M. Shapiro http://rabbirami.com/#Perrenial-Wisdom

“Religions are like languages: no language is true or false; all languages are of human origin; each language reflects and shapes the civilization that speaks it; there are things you can say in one language that you cannot say or say as well in another; and the more languages you speak, the more nuanced your understanding of life becomes.” http://rabbirami.com/

My humble senryu: Thanksgiving Day Wisdom

I’m grateful for you,

for us, for all beings and

this day to say THANKS

Three granddaughters with Nonno Photo taken by my daughter Mary

High Coo – Nov 23 – Thankful for My Dog Day

“Big dogs, small dogs, yappy dogs, fluffy dogs, all kinds of dogs deserve our love and affection every day, but most of all on Thankful for My Dog Day.

In Western society, people highly value dogs because of their characteristics of friendship, protectiveness, loyalty, and affection. Dogs are also widely used in animal-assisted therapy. This type of treatment helps to relieve anxiety, pain, and depression in people with a range of mental or physical health problems.

Show off your dog today. Post photos and videos of your pupper on social media and say how proud you are of them. Also, tell your dog you love them when you’re with other people — animals understand when we’re pleased with them.” https://nationaltoday.com/thankful-for-my-dog-day/

Today’s haiku: Thankful for My Dog Day

In ev’ry season

dogs point out nature highlights

let’s follow their lead

Here’s a few photos from our household:

Please post photos of your dog(s) below.

High Coo – Nov 22 – Humane Society Anniversary Day

Jean Chung/For HSI 2017

Humane Society International, (HSI), is a non-profit organization dedicated to promoting animal welfare. It addresses animal cruelty, including inhumane practices and conditions affecting companion and farm animals, illegal animal trade, animal slaughter, and use of animals in research and product testing.

Humane Society Anniversary Day, celebrated on November 22 every year, signifies the establishment of Humane Society International, the world’s largest animal protection organization. Did you know that every year, Humane Society International saves hundreds of animals from cruelty cases? Humane Society International strives to promote the human-animal bond, protect and rescue animals, and more across the world.https://nationaltoday.com/humane-society-anniversary-day/

Why care about non-human animals?

  1. “Violence against animals has been linked to a higher likelihood of criminal violence and domestic abuse. So, violence against animals must be stopped.
  2. According to statistics, one animal is abused every minute in the world.
  3. Annually, over 10 million animals in the U.S. die as a result of abuse.
  4. The U.S. has over 10, 000 known puppy mills.
  5. Despite the fact that most animals are fully capable of surviving in the wild or in cities on their own, they are subjected to a great deal of cruelty and abuse. We can be their voice.

One thing we can take home from the Humane Society Anniversary is that not only humans but all creatures are created equal. We need to treat all animals with compassion and love.https://nationaltoday.com/humane-society-anniversary-day/

http://www.hsi.org/issues/dog-cat-welfare/

Today’s senryu: Happy Anniversary HSI

multiply caring:

together we accomplish

more than one can do

High Coo – Nov 21 – World Hello Day

Freepik

Since 1971, World Hello Day has been celebrated as a simple, nonviolent, peace promoting, secular holiday.

Recognized by over 180 countries and supported by Nobel Peace Laureates, celebrities and writers, this is something everyone can do.

Specific suggestions include saying hello to at least 10 people every day and learning how to say hello in multiple languages.

See https://nationaltoday.com/world-hello-day/ and https://www.babbel.com/en/magazine/how-to-say-hello-in-10-different-languages

Today’s senryu: World Hello Day

privet, ni hao, chao,

hola, bonjour and hallo –

please give peace a chance

quotesgram.com

High Coo – Nov 20 – National Absurdity Day

@ Pinterest

As Sarah A. Bowen, director of the Animal Chaplaincy program and author of Sacred Sendoffs (c) 2022, would say WTF? BTW: WTF is short for What the Fluff. https://www.sacredsendoffs.com/

So, today is National Absurdity Day – where did this come from?

The real philosophy of absurdism began in the 19th century in the mind of a Danish philosopher called Kierkegaard. Its premise is that humans are all searching to find meaning in a meaningless universe. As the years passed, this philosophy gained popularity and became the touchstone for a movement in theatre and literature in Europe and North America.

In the 1950s and 1960s, the peak of such artistic movements as the Theater of the Absurd and Surrealism gave rise to an entire genre of literature based on nonsequitur behaviors and otherworldly plots. One of the works from this time, “Waiting for Godot”, is based entirely around a pair of characters waiting at a tree for their friend, Godot — whom we never meet — to arrive.

The origins of National Absurdity Day are apropos to the subject at hand. They’re entirely unknown.” See https://nationaltoday.com/national-absurdity-day/

For more information on the philosophy of absurdism see https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Absurdism and https://poemanalysis.com/genre/absurd/

Today’s poem: National Absurdity Day

another day in

(where am I again) – oh, yeah

paradise, with you

Enjoy the chaos of today 🙂

writersthesaurus.com

High Coo – Nov 19 – Giving and Receiving

nicepng.com

As we approach the giving season, a couple of wise sayings come to mind:

“Some people spend their money freely and still grow richer. Others are cautious, and yet grow poorer. Be generous, and you will be prosperous. Help others and you will be helped.” Proverbs 11:24-25 http://www.goodnewsbible.com

“If you knew, as I do, the power of giving, you would not let a single meal pass without sharing some of it.” http://www.quuf.org/the-buddha-on-the-power-of-generosity/

While generosity is a common topic across religions, it is also a subject for academic research. See https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hK6xbsn1jfw and The Science of Generosity at https://generosityresearch.nd.edu/

Whomever or whatever motivates you, please consider giving a little more this year.

Today’s senryu: Giving and Receiving

if you see a need

then contribute what you can

what goes ’round comes ’round

https://www.istockphoto.com/photos/showing-generosity

November 18 – Remembering A Deceased Loved One

Memorial site for a traffic accident on a country road

Remembering a loved one doesn’t necessarily need to end at the memorial service or the death site. Both of these actions are appropriate responses yet more may be desired to keep the loved one’s memory closer to home, closer to you on a daily basis.

Two writings offer some helpful advice. First is an article by Allison Grinberg-Funes (https://www.eterneva.com/resources/memorialize-loved-ones) in which she offers Ideas for Memorializing Deceased Loved Ones:

  1. Turn their ashes into a cremation diamond
  2. Visit their final resting place
  3. Do something they enjoyed or you did together
  4. Have a memorial release with balloons or butterflies
  5. Listen to their favorite songs or watch their favorite movies
  6. Look through old photos with friends and family
  7. Plant a tree, shrub, or flowers and visit it
  8. Create a memorial website or Facebook page
  9. Donate to their favorite charity
  10. Eat or cook their favorite food
  11. Write them a letter, poem or song.

The second writing is a section from Thich Nhat Hanh’s book How To Live When A Loved One Dies (c) 2020, Parallax Press called Making An Altar For Your Loved One:

“When we have lost someone we love, we often feel the need to express our deep love and gratitude to them…and we want to keep their memory alive…Making a shrine or altar is a concrete way of expressing our love and care, and of helping us feel connected to them. We can set up a small table and place a photograph of our loved one, a candle, some flowers, and other meaningful things on it.” p.133 http://www.parallax.org/product/how-to-live-when-a-loved-one-dies/

Check out both sources for more information.

In the meantime, here is today’s brief poem: Remembering A Deceased Loved One

our lives together

made great memories for us –

thank you forever

bentmetalworks.com